The Student Advocacy Project: A 3 Part Series (Part 3)

ex·hib·it

(ig-zib-it)

to offer or expose to view, to display, to present, to make manifest; explain.

Can you describe a time you have been an advocate for music therapy?

“I have had several occasions when I am discussing music therapy with special education teachers, occupational therapists, speech therapists, and physical therapists. It was important for me to explain that my future profession addresses similar goals as the other therapies.”  -Erica Porter, Senior at Nazareth College

“I actually went to a party this weekend and was talking to an acquantance about my 2nd clinic placement. Of course, he did not know what Music therapy was! I explained it and gave examples from my clinic placement last semester. He was very interested and impressed that I am helping people in such a great way.”  -Barbara Lippman, Junior at Nazareth College

“I’ve been an advocate for music therapy when I have described and explained what I have done in the clinical setting. It is especially effective when I share how a client has improved or positively reacted to music during a session. I also have presented to fellow music students how music therapists can assist music educators in a school setting.”  -Rebecca Finnigan, Senior at Nazareth College

“Worked for GST Boces summer of 2008-09 as 1-1 aide in 6:1:1 summer school high school autism classroom. I did “therapeutic music” sessions in the hallway once a week. Music therapy is not widely known in the southern tier by all of the students and teachers- but they loved it and wanted to have it full time. The teachers petitioned the board and new GST BOCES is looking to find a music therapist!”  Stephanie Kawzenuk, MAR-AMTAS President, Senior at Nazareth College

“I have been an advocate for M.T. when I have visited my old friend Joe when he was in the hospital. Joe is 88 and has parkinsons. I am a homehealth aide on the weekends for Joe and  during Christmas Joe got sick and needed to go to the hospital. Joe used to play the guitar, and it helps him eliminate stress. I visited Joe in the hospital a number of times with my guitar. I was an advocate for music therapy in the hospital room, the elevator, and hallways when many different people asked why I had my guitar.”  -Taylor DeLeo, Junior at Nazareth College

“I met my chiropractor for the first time and he asked me what I was going to school for. When I said music therapy, he was like “What’s that?!” I was surprised he never heard of it since he is in the medical field. I told him what music therapy was, and the different types of interventions that can be done with the different types of population’s music therapists work with. He said that he loves to play blues piano and find a it very relaxing to him. I feel good that I was able to spread the word of music therapy to medical professionals.”  -Gina Schuster, Senior at Nazareth College

“Demonstrating the value of our field to the interdisciplinary team at kids camp (an on campus interdisciplinary camp). These students from these other disciplines got to see first hand what we do and how well it compliments what they do.”  -Sarah Kliman, President of Nazareth Chapter, Senior at Nazareth College

“During the MAR 2008 conference, Nazareth college participated in the “student service project” in a hospital in Cherry Hill, NJ. We implemented physical communicative and social activities for the group. While we were leading the group, an administrator of the hospital stopped to talk to our supervising music therapist about what we were doing. Through the observation of our group and conversation with the MT-BC the administrator was looking to hire a part time music therapist. A couple years later, Carol Ann Blank, MAR Government Relations Chair, revisited the incident. Blank found out that the hospital indeed did hire a music therapist. Nazareth college helped advocate for music therapy and created a job!”  –Elaine Vuong, MAR-AMTAS Government Relations, Senior at Nazareth College

 

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2 Comments

Filed under Music Therapy, Student Life

2 responses to “The Student Advocacy Project: A 3 Part Series (Part 3)

  1. Pingback: How Should We View Autism? | Music Therapy Maven

  2. Pingback: Music Therapy Advocacy Month (features a Michigan music therapist!) at Michigan Music Therapists

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